Minerals identify

Know how to recognize them

Anhydrite

Sulfate mineral

Anhydrite, or anhydrous calcium sulfate , is a mineral CaSO4. It is in the orthorhombic crystal system, with three directions of perfect cleavage parallel to the three planes of symmetry with the orthorhombic barium (celestine) sulfates, as might be expected from the chemical formulas. Distinctly developed crystals are somewhat rare, the mineral usually presenting the form of cleavage masses. The Mohs hardness is 2.9. The color is white, sometimes greyish, bluish, or purple. On the best developed of the three cleavages, the lustre is pearly; on other surfaces it is glassy. When exposed to water, anhydrite readily transforms to the more commonly occurring gypsum , (CaSO4·2H2O) by the absorption of water. This transformation is reversible, with gypsum or calcium sulfate hemihydrate forming anhydrite by heating to around 200 °C (400 °F) under normal atmospheric conditions. Anhydrite is commonly associated with calcite , and sulfides, molybdenite in vein deposits.

Identification

Color of mineral

Blue
Violet
White
Brown
Grey

Mohs scale ( mineral hardness )

3.5

Density ( specific gravity )

1.567
1.574
1.609

Luster ( interacts light )

Greasy
Pearly
Vitreous

Crystal ( diaphaneity )

Orthorhombic