Minerals identify

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Lawsonite

Sorosilicate

Lawsonite is a hydrous calcium aluminium sorosilicate mineral with formula CaAl2Si2O7(OH)2·H2O. Lawsonite crystallizes in the orthorhombic system in prismatic, often tabular crystals. Crystal twinning is common. It forms transparent to translucent colorless, white, and bluish to pinkish grey glassy to greasy crystals. Refractive indices are nα=1.665, nβ=1.672 - 1.676, and nγ=1.684 - 1.686. It is typically almost colorless in thin section, but some lawsonite is pleochroic from colorless to pale yellow to pale blue, depending on orientation. The mineral has a Mohs hardness of 8 and a specific gravity of 3.09. It has perfect cleavage in two directions and a brittle fracture.

Lawsonite is a metamorphic mineral typical of the blueschist facies. It also occurs as a secondary mineral in altered gabbro. Associate minerals include epidote, garnet. It is an uncommon constituent of eclogite.

It was first described in 1895 for occurrences in the Tiburon peninsula, Marin County, California. It was named for geologist (1861–1952) of the University of California by two of Lawson's graduate students, Charles Palache and Frederick Leslie Ransome

Identification

Color of mineral

White
Grey
Blue

Mohs scale ( mineral hardness )

7.5

Density ( specific gravity )

1.665
1.672
1.684

Luster ( interacts light )

Vitreous
Greasy

Crystal ( diaphaneity )

Orthorhombic